honor death - candles in the dark representing death

How to honor death & grief

This weekend is one of the hardest ones out of the year for me. Mostly because Saturday is the date of my Dad's death. He actually died on Tuesday. Dates and days are funny things when they come up so many years later. Our bodies remember the days rather than the dates, at least that has been my experience. Choosing to honor death regardless of how I feel has been part of how I move forward.

I would wager that the same things are happening for your residents/patients/loved ones. In your line of work, grief, death, and regrets are everyday experiences and feelings for those around you. I'm sure you have your own coping mechanisms with how you manage to get through it all while still being human with the people in your care. If you would like a few more, I've done extensive writing on it, but the article below is a good place to start.

Having open and honest conversations about death and dying is a great way to connect on a wickedly deep level with another person. It is also one way to restore human dignity and let another person know you honor and respect their grief experience.

Mini-Trainings & Death

Just about every day (except weekends) I am dropping podcast snippets designed to help you connect, build rapport, and support your storytellers. Topics vary from how to's to specific 5 minute storytelling scripts. Each snippet is usually less than 2 minutes with a few exceptions. You can find it on almost all the major podcasting platforms by searching “5 Minute Storytelling” or by starting here

These mini-trainings include segments on death, loss, and so much more to help you engage on a human level with your residents. This conversation can be incredibly difficult to start, I get it. These scripts can help you ease into the hard conversations and help you create deeper connections.

I hope you can find a way to weave these important conversations into your day. For me, this is top of mind because this time of year is peppered with major losses that have happened over the years. Even if this isn't relevant for you right at this moment or you aren't ready to have these conversations, remember you can always come back and visit when you are ready.

-Gael

  1. Photos, Death, and Storytelling
  2. Outlining, Blank Pages & Storytelling
  3. Planning, Pantsing, and Storytelling
  4. Storytelling & Slightly Unfiltered
  5. Moving, Calling on Friends, and Storytelling
  6. 5 Minute Storytelling, Context, and the Method Behind the Madness
  7. About Me Conundrums, Back to School & Storytelling
  8. Journaling & Writing with Quill Pens & Sticks
  9. Camping, Labor Day & Storytelling
  10. Art & Storytelling

Comments 1

  1. Pingback: 5 Ways to Write About, Remember & Honor Hard Memories

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.